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Peanut Butter Dunkel Weizen

Peanut butter extract added to dunkel weisen fro flavoring

Style: German Weizens / Dunkel Weizen
Recipe Type: Extract Rating: 0.000
Added By: BigHeadTodd Added: 4/19/2015

Peanut Butter Dunkel Schnauzer Weisen

Dunkel Weisen made with some peanut butter extract

Style: German Weizens / Dunkel Weizen
Recipe Type: Extract Rating: 0.000
Added By: BigHeadTodd Added: 4/19/2015

Goodbye to Freedom Double IPA

Total of 6oz. of hops, including 2oz dry-hopping goodness. Strong & Bitter. Will put hair on your chest.

Style: American Ales / American IPA
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 4.000
Added By: BeerNard Added: 5/04/2014

Dry hoggin' heaven

American brown ale, lightly hopped, with bacon and maple syrup

Style: American Ales / American (or Texas) Brown Ale
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 0.000
Added By: BeerNard Added: 9/18/2012

Honey Blonde IPA

when I brewed this, I was worried that I had overdone it with hops, but as it went through the process and I tasted it along the way, my worries faded. It has a teriffic grapefruit nose and back of the tongue bite, then finishes with just the right amount...

Style: American Ales / American IPA
Recipe Type: Extract Rating: 0.000
Added By: 1eyedjack Added: 3/24/2012

Honey Blonde IPA

when I brewed this, I was worried that I had overdone it with hops, but as it went through the process and I tasted it along the way, my worries faded. It has a teriffic grapefruit nose and back of the tongue bite, then finishes with just the right amount...

Style: American Ales / American IPA
Recipe Type: Extract Rating: 0.000
Added By: 1eyedjack Added: 3/24/2012

Honey Blonde IPA

when I brewed this, I was worried that I had overdone it with hops, but as it went through the process and I tasted it along the way, my worries faded. It has a teriffic grapefruit nose and back of the tongue bite, then finishes with just the right amount...

Style: American Ales / American IPA
Recipe Type: Extract Rating: 0.000
Added By: 1eyedjack Added: 3/24/2012

Vanilla Coffee Porter

This will be entered into the Hops for Homes brew competition in Oneonta.

Style: Porters / Robust Porter
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 0.000
Added By: BeerNard Added: 1/04/2012

crazy injun apa v1.1

version 1.1 of a beer i made a while ago. first one came out good, changed the grains a bit. i had 3 lbs of c75 so i used that.

Style: American Ales / American (or Texas) Brown Ale
Recipe Type: Full Mash Rating: 0.000
Added By: reinheitsgebrewer Added: 8/10/2011

Smitty's TRUE BREW Porter

I used True Brew's Porter kit plus I added some extra items to this batch including pure maple syrup, black patent grains and candy sugar. My goal for this batch was to develop a very portery beer that offered a nice buzz after 1 or 2!

Style: Porters / Other Porters
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 4.330
Added By: Turbosteviej455 Added: 6/09/2011
Down

My First Biere de Garde

An adaptation of a full mash Biere de Garde recipe - hoping to make in a couple weeks! Please give me suggestions/comments.

Style: Lagered Ales and Aled Lagers / Biere de Garde
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 5.000
Added By: mattdrake Added: 2/24/2010

MaPale 2009 Light Amber

On 5/3/2009 SPV and SAV made some home brew (maple beer). We made 2 batches everything the same except one used 1 gal light amber (Link's Syrup) and one used 1 gal B grade (Very Dark Amber) maple syrup.

Style: Specialty Brew / Specialty Brew
Recipe Type: Extract Rating: 5.000
Added By: svossler Added: 5/11/2010

MaPale 2009 Dark Amber

On 5/3/2009 SPV and SAV made some home brew (maple beer). We made 2 batches everything the same except one used 1 gal light amber (Link's Syrup) and one used 1 gal B grade (Very Dark Amber) maple syrup.

Style: Specialty Brew / Specialty Brew
Recipe Type: Extract Rating: 5.000
Added By: svossler Added: 5/11/2010

MaPale Spring 2011

(60gal. biggest batch brewed) This beer was brewed by blink and myself. We brewed the wirt in Uncle Mark's new 15 gallon pot. We put 4 gallons of Maple Syrup and 1 gallon of Muttons extra light malt extract. Toward the end we added 4 ozs of horizon hops. We...

Style: American Ales / American Pale Ale
Recipe Type: Extract Rating: 5.000
Added By: svossler Added: 5/24/2011

Robust Porter

I haven't brewed this one yet, but am gonna buy ingredients right now. Hopefully it will be strong and flavorful, but not take too long to ferment or age, so I can drink it in a month or so, before winter is over

Style: Porters / Robust Porter
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 5.000
Added By: BeerNard Added: 1/31/2010

Patriot Stout (Blueberry Maple)

We mashed the blueberries up with some sort of, umm... masher, i guess. We heated them up to sanitize them then dumped them into the keg along with the wort. Try to boil at least 5 gallons of wort, because its gonna be dense with all the extract and maple...

Style: Stouts / American Stout
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 4.720
Added By: BeerNard Added: 8/30/2010

Smitty's TRUE BREW Porter

I used True Brew's Porter kit plus I added some extra items to this batch including pure maple syrup, black patent grains and candy sugar. My goal for this batch was to develop a very portery beer that offered a nice buzz after 1 or 2!

Style: Porters / Other Porters
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 4.330
Added By: Turbosteviej455 Added: 6/09/2011

Maple Nut Brown Ale

Panvostin Brewery Special: Dark ale crafted with pure maple syrup with a subtle hint of chocolate flavors.

Style: English Mild and Brown Ales / Northern Brown
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 4.200
Added By: Vossybrew Added: 2/01/2010

American Super Double Imperial IPA

A blisteringly bitter beer that should satisfy the most extreme type of Hop Head, but also smooth and significant malt flavors and a high ABV% from nearly 20lbs of grains. The spotlight is on the Columbus hops for the bittering, aroma and flavor, while the less harsh Cascade hops are...

Style: American Ales / American IPA
Recipe Type: Full Mash Rating: 4.200
Added By: BeerNard Added: 4/26/2009

Goodbye to Freedom Double IPA

Total of 6oz. of hops, including 2oz dry-hopping goodness. Strong & Bitter. Will put hair on your chest.

Style: American Ales / American IPA
Recipe Type: Extract + Specialty Grain Rating: 4.000
Added By: BeerNard Added: 5/04/2014
Down

Brew U

Okay, so you like beer. Why not make your own? It’s really as simple as that. Good beer can be made by anyone! If you have the ability to function in the world (breathe, eat, sleep and repeat) and you know how to count (one, two, four, three, eleventy…) you have the prerequisites for brewing great beer. For around $100 you can have beer that’s just as good, or better, than anything you can buy in the store. It will also be cheaper per beer than any decent commercial or micro-brew, and it will fit your taste better, because you will most likely make types of beer that you enjoy.

The freedom to create your own recipes means there are no boundaries, and as long as you stick to some basic rules you’re nearly guaranteed to be satisfied. Hey, even if you don’t take my advice and make a beer that tastes like a dirty sock from the garbage chute of the lifetime testing department at Toilets R’ Us, you’ll still be able to take pride in knowing that this hell-icious creation came from your brain and was brought to fruition with labor that was yours and yours alone. Seriously though, it is incredibly easy and a ton of fun, and I can’t think of any reason why not try it out. The feeling you get from handing friends a bottle of some magic concoction that you created (and them actually enjoying it) is well worth the minimal effort.

First, add water to your brew kettle. You want to leave enough room for your malt extract so you shouldn’t fill the kettle all the way up. When you boil the wort (this is what your non-alcoholic sugar-water mixture is called), it can boil pretty vigorously and boiling over is a definite possibility. This is another good reason not to fill your kettle to the top. In a 20qt. (5 gallon) kettle, 2.5 gallons of H2O works pretty well.

If you’re brewing with specialty grains, which most kits have and most recipes call for, you’ll want to heat the water to 160°F - 170°F and hold there. Put your specialty grains in the cheesecloth or mesh grain bag, and steep in the hot water for 15 – 20 minutes. Just pretend you are making a large cup of tea. The exact temperature is not too important as long as its not too high. Temperatures in excess of ~190°F can cause unpleasantly smelling and tasting compounds to be released from the grains. After the time is up, throw the grains away (if you have a dog, I’ve heard of making these spent grains into some sort of doggie candy bar).

You may or may not actually have a transfer day. Some beers will be ready in a week and you won’t need any other ingredients or adjuncts. I recommend using your glass carboy as a secondary fermenter though. The main reason is that during initial fermentation, a lot of yeast cells die and collect on the bottom. The longer the beer sits on this yeast bed, the more likely it is to collect a “yeasty” taste. Transferring to another container gives you time to allow the beer to fully ferment without worrying about changing the taste. Secondary fermentation is also a convenient time to add other additives, or adjuncts, to your beer in future batches where you want to get a little fancier.

All that you have to do is learn how to siphon the wort from one container to another. If all you have is a hose, it can be tricky. You don’t want to use your mouth, because your mouth has bacteria on it (bacteria = bad). You want to place the fermentation bucket next to, and higher than the secondary vessel. Fill the hose completely with water and place your thumbs over each end. Now put one end of the hose just above the level of the beer and the other end just over the top of the glass carboy. Make sure the carboy end of the hose is below the end in the fermenter. Take your thumbs off both ends at the same time and immediately place one into the beer. Transfer as much of the wort as you feel comfortable without siphoning the bed of yeast at the bottom, typically ½ to 1 inch tall.

Alrighty then, so you’ve waited close to 2 long weeks or more and you’re probably pretty thirsty. Don’t worry, it won’t be long now. Use your hydrometer and take a reading of the specific gravity. It should be pretty close to the gravity predicted in your beer kit. Even if it has reached your goal, its probably better that you wait to bottle it for just a little longer. Check it the next day, and if the reading is any lower, your beer is still fermenting and it shouldn’t be bottled yet. Disregarding this rule could cause a lot of broken glass and shrapnel when you overcarbonate the brew. When the hydrometer reading is the same two days in a row, proceed to the next step.

First you need some sugar to carbonate your beer. Use corn sugar (a.k.a. glucose, dextrose) because it’s completely fermentable and won’t add any more flavor to your already delicious brew. Hopefully this is what came in your brew kit. If not, complain loudly and go buy some dextrose at the grocery store. The typical amount to use is ¾ cup for a five gallon batch (no more, or the term “beer bomb” might take on a different meaning to you). Boil the sugar in two cups of filtered water for 5 – 10 minutes.

Take the lid off (or the cork out of) your fermenter and use the same process with your siphon to transfer the BEER (that’s right, you now have beer instead of wort) as you did on transfer day. If you didn’t have a secondary fermentation step, refer to the procedure here.

The rest is easy. Pour the sugar solution into the beer and set the lid lightly on the bottling bucket. Now if you have a bottle filler, attach it to the spout on the bucket and fill your bottles. If not a hose will do just fine. Leave around ½ inch of airspace in the top of the bottle (enough room for carbonation to increase pressure without anything exploding). Cap the bottles and put them aside until they’re ready. Light can affect the flavor of the beer, so keep them in a dark place. Too much variation in temperature can be bad also. I use a closet and try to avoid the urge to practice my radio button twisting ability on the thermostat.

Congratulations! The beer should be done about a week after Bottling Day. The only way to know for sure is to check. Make sure to use a glass, so you can enjoy the whole package; the aroma, the color, the foamy mustache, and even the taste (if you’re into that sort of thing)! If it does taste a little flat after 7 days, it will get better every day. Some beers take longer than others; that’s just how it goes. I’ll always try a new batch after 7 days, but I don’t plan any homebrew festivals or give any away for at least 10.

Hopefully you’re satisfied with your beer! I hope you’ve realized that it’s not rocket science, and anyone that likes to have a frosty brew every once in a while has a choice, and doesn’t have to just settle for the commercial options out there. I also hope this tutorial was helpful. I wanted to keep it simple so that people who may be intimidated by the process might see that it’s not so difficult. The main point is that nothing is lost by giving it a go. I also wanted to point out that though I might have made some kind of melodramatic statements about what will happen if something goes amiss, it’s really just sarcasm and meant for less boring reading. I’ve never seen anything go really wrong with a beer. I’ve seen the wort boil over, I’ve tasted yeasty flavors that weren’t meant to be in the beer, I’ve drank beer before it was carbonated and I’ve drank beer that tastes like vinegar (actually, that was more like a wine than a beer). None of these are big deals, and they’ve taught me how not to make these mistakes in the next batch. More importantly, though, is that I’ve never made or helped make a batch that wasn’t drinkable. I’ve never seen beer bottles explode either, but this is the one area where throwing caution to the wind may be a poor idea. Beer bottles can hold a lot of pressure (they’re meant to), but way overdoing it on priming sugar or bottling during fermentation could cause problems. If you watch out for this, there should be nothing else that will screw up your beer.

MaPale Spring 2011

(60gal. biggest batch brewed) This beer was brewed by blink and myself. We brewed the wirt in Uncle Mark's new 15 gallon pot. We put 4 gallons of Maple Syrup and 1 gallon of Muttons... More

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